Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 1 of 3
Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 1 of 3

A set of web and email graphics that I designed and produced for a seven day sponsored email campaign. The client is a log cabin staining and chemical company. They were sold a seven day email campaign that would be marketed to the substantial audiences in the loghome.com and cabinlife.com web and social environments. The goal was to make staining your log home "fun" and "light-hearted" which can be quite the task normally.

So our editor wrote the emails as if you were progressing through a video game. The concept is you are "fighting off" the different environmental enemies of wood. Each day you would get one "level's" email and after progressing through the seven days of emails/levels, on the 7th day you would have "beaten" the game. It was my job to figure out how to visually represent these concepts and to design and produce the graphics for those emails and respective marketing for them.

I decided to go with a retro, 8-bit game theme as opposed to some slick, shinny new game graphics. Retro is “in” right now, and I thought this style of game would have the most appeal to the wide age gap of the log home and cabin life audiences. The older generation can appreciate the throw back, while the younger generation can be enticed by the "coolness" factor of it.

Click to the right to see the graphics placed in their respective emails and web pages.

Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 2 of 3
Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 2 of 3

Here you can see the graphics placed in their respective pages. I did not design the website pages or emails. Starting on the left you can see the home page banner graphics on cabinlife.com, teasing the game and a "call to action". These were were designed to tease the idea of the email campaign while capturing the user's attention and driving the user to the sign-up page (right).

For the sign-up page graphic, I decided to tease all the level's "monsters" that you would be "defending" against. This where we would capture the user's info and the final sales pitch as to why they should sign up for the email campaign. Even though there were seven days/levels to progress through, the last two emails weren't so much about fighting as much as there were about taking what you've learned and applying it to your wood home. Which is why I only tease the "monster's" from the first five emails/levels.

And then to the right, you have the first two days emails of the seven day email campaign, starting with Level 1. Each email got a header graphic at the top of the email, and then a footer graphic teasing the next day's level/email at the bottom.

Click to the right to see the remaining 5 emails' graphics placed for context.

Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 3 of 3
Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 3 of 3

Here you can see the remaining five days of emails and my header and footer graphics that I designed, placed in the emails for context, which again, I did not design. You can see how one would "progress" through the levels, fighting off the different attacks on your log home's logs. I aimed for a consistent look and feel, yet wanted something different for each level.

This was a fun project to design and work on, and was a nice change of pace from the type of work I normally do. And the client loved it, so that's always a bonus too.

Coventry Web Banners 2018
Coventry Web Banners 2018

Three sets of web banners that I designed for Coventry Log Homes for their "Web Takeover" on loghome.com. Since each set of banners will be rotating throughout the week, I wanted a consistent theme across the ads, but with different elements and colors to offset each group of ads. Original design & graphics. Supplied photography.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 1 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 1 of 6

A case study and redesign of SketchUp’s blog with an emphasis on mobile first. The original design (left: mobile, right: desktop) shown here. You can see a clear need for better hierarchy. For instance, there is no way to completely see what kind of categories of blog posts there are in the blog. Also, the date isn’t shown, making it hard to know how timely a blog post is.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 2 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 2 of 6

Here is my redesign of SketchUp’s blog (left: mobile, right: desktop). I didn’t want to reinvent their branding, so I kept their colors and themes, but I did want to make the blog feel like it was more built into the page. So, I did away with the redundant “SketchUp Blog” headers, which in turn, creates two different navigational systems. The top for the SketchUp’s main, global site, and then a simple button system to filter which category of blog posts you would like to see.

I also incorporated more negative space and buffering around the posts, tying the blog header and navigation system together with the posts. By using a card system design, I was able to take better advantage of the desktop real estate, which also helps better separate and clarify the posts on mobile. I also “chunked” up the typography to increase contrast, and got the dates in to provide better context.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 3 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 3 of 6

This slide shows what happens when you select a category or tag of blog post on the original design (left: mobile, right: desktop). There is not a clear visual connection between the category you’ve selected and the posts you’re seeing. Also, for some reason the posts lose their tag identifying what category of post it is.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 4 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 4 of 6

Here, in my redesign (left: mobile, right: desktop), you can now clearly see the context of which category of posts you’ve selected. By using a permanent menu system, you can always know what you have selected and where you are in the context of the blog. The posts also still show their tags, reaffirming your selection.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 5 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 5 of 6

Here, you see the original design (left: mobile, right: desktop) of a selected blog post. There’s no “hero image”, the fonts are light and thin — making it hard to read the body — and it’s not clear what category of post this falls into. Is it a “News & Update” or “Skill Builder” post? On top of that, the social/share buttons are small and at the top of the post, before you know if you even want to share the post.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 6 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 6 of 6

This final slide of my redesign showcases what a selected blog post would look like (left: mobile, right: desktop). I brought in the card’s image to become the top “hero image” and then clearly separated the post’s category tag from the post’s title creating a better visual hierarchy. Keeping the post’s author and date metadata at the top provides additional context.

I also increased the buffering around the post to give the copy some breathing room, while also increasing the weight, size and color of the copy, making it more legible on a mobile device. And last but not least, I moved the social share icons to the bottom of the post, so they are right there at your fingertips when you finish reading the post.

Riverbend iPad Ad
Riverbend iPad Ad

Interactive floor plan ad for Timber Home Living's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap on another home. Original design. Supplied photography.

Savvy Shopper iPad Article
Savvy Shopper iPad Article

Interactive editorial department for Timber Home Living's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap on another chair and swipe on pull tab. Original design. Supplied photography.

Bendheim iPad Ad
Bendheim iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for New Old House's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you swipe to see more images. Original design. Supplied photography.

Talk of the Town iPad Article
Talk of the Town iPad Article

Interactive editorial department for Timber Home Living's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap to see more details and scroll to continue reading. Original design. Supplied photography.

The Cabinetmaker iPad Ad
The Cabinetmaker iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for New Old House's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap to see full image. Original design. Supplied photography.

Simply Amish iPad Ad
Simply Amish iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for Arts & Crafts Home's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you swipe to see more images. Original design. Supplied photography.

Antique Hardware iPad Ad
Antique Hardware iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for Old House Journal's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap to see product details. Original design. Supplied photography.

Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 1 of 3
Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 2 of 3
Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 3 of 3
Coventry Web Banners 2018
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 1 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 2 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 3 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 4 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 5 of 6
SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 6 of 6
Riverbend iPad Ad
Savvy Shopper iPad Article
Bendheim iPad Ad
Talk of the Town iPad Article
The Cabinetmaker iPad Ad
Simply Amish iPad Ad
Antique Hardware iPad Ad
Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 1 of 3

A set of web and email graphics that I designed and produced for a seven day sponsored email campaign. The client is a log cabin staining and chemical company. They were sold a seven day email campaign that would be marketed to the substantial audiences in the loghome.com and cabinlife.com web and social environments. The goal was to make staining your log home "fun" and "light-hearted" which can be quite the task normally.

So our editor wrote the emails as if you were progressing through a video game. The concept is you are "fighting off" the different environmental enemies of wood. Each day you would get one "level's" email and after progressing through the seven days of emails/levels, on the 7th day you would have "beaten" the game. It was my job to figure out how to visually represent these concepts and to design and produce the graphics for those emails and respective marketing for them.

I decided to go with a retro, 8-bit game theme as opposed to some slick, shinny new game graphics. Retro is “in” right now, and I thought this style of game would have the most appeal to the wide age gap of the log home and cabin life audiences. The older generation can appreciate the throw back, while the younger generation can be enticed by the "coolness" factor of it.

Click to the right to see the graphics placed in their respective emails and web pages.

Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 2 of 3

Here you can see the graphics placed in their respective pages. I did not design the website pages or emails. Starting on the left you can see the home page banner graphics on cabinlife.com, teasing the game and a "call to action". These were were designed to tease the idea of the email campaign while capturing the user's attention and driving the user to the sign-up page (right).

For the sign-up page graphic, I decided to tease all the level's "monsters" that you would be "defending" against. This where we would capture the user's info and the final sales pitch as to why they should sign up for the email campaign. Even though there were seven days/levels to progress through, the last two emails weren't so much about fighting as much as there were about taking what you've learned and applying it to your wood home. Which is why I only tease the "monster's" from the first five emails/levels.

And then to the right, you have the first two days emails of the seven day email campaign, starting with Level 1. Each email got a header graphic at the top of the email, and then a footer graphic teasing the next day's level/email at the bottom.

Click to the right to see the remaining 5 emails' graphics placed for context.

Continental 7 Day Email Campaign Case Study 3 of 3

Here you can see the remaining five days of emails and my header and footer graphics that I designed, placed in the emails for context, which again, I did not design. You can see how one would "progress" through the levels, fighting off the different attacks on your log home's logs. I aimed for a consistent look and feel, yet wanted something different for each level.

This was a fun project to design and work on, and was a nice change of pace from the type of work I normally do. And the client loved it, so that's always a bonus too.

Coventry Web Banners 2018

Three sets of web banners that I designed for Coventry Log Homes for their "Web Takeover" on loghome.com. Since each set of banners will be rotating throughout the week, I wanted a consistent theme across the ads, but with different elements and colors to offset each group of ads. Original design & graphics. Supplied photography.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 1 of 6

A case study and redesign of SketchUp’s blog with an emphasis on mobile first. The original design (left: mobile, right: desktop) shown here. You can see a clear need for better hierarchy. For instance, there is no way to completely see what kind of categories of blog posts there are in the blog. Also, the date isn’t shown, making it hard to know how timely a blog post is.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 2 of 6

Here is my redesign of SketchUp’s blog (left: mobile, right: desktop). I didn’t want to reinvent their branding, so I kept their colors and themes, but I did want to make the blog feel like it was more built into the page. So, I did away with the redundant “SketchUp Blog” headers, which in turn, creates two different navigational systems. The top for the SketchUp’s main, global site, and then a simple button system to filter which category of blog posts you would like to see.

I also incorporated more negative space and buffering around the posts, tying the blog header and navigation system together with the posts. By using a card system design, I was able to take better advantage of the desktop real estate, which also helps better separate and clarify the posts on mobile. I also “chunked” up the typography to increase contrast, and got the dates in to provide better context.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 3 of 6

This slide shows what happens when you select a category or tag of blog post on the original design (left: mobile, right: desktop). There is not a clear visual connection between the category you’ve selected and the posts you’re seeing. Also, for some reason the posts lose their tag identifying what category of post it is.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 4 of 6

Here, in my redesign (left: mobile, right: desktop), you can now clearly see the context of which category of posts you’ve selected. By using a permanent menu system, you can always know what you have selected and where you are in the context of the blog. The posts also still show their tags, reaffirming your selection.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 5 of 6

Here, you see the original design (left: mobile, right: desktop) of a selected blog post. There’s no “hero image”, the fonts are light and thin — making it hard to read the body — and it’s not clear what category of post this falls into. Is it a “News & Update” or “Skill Builder” post? On top of that, the social/share buttons are small and at the top of the post, before you know if you even want to share the post.

SketchUp Blog Case Study and Redesign 6 of 6

This final slide of my redesign showcases what a selected blog post would look like (left: mobile, right: desktop). I brought in the card’s image to become the top “hero image” and then clearly separated the post’s category tag from the post’s title creating a better visual hierarchy. Keeping the post’s author and date metadata at the top provides additional context.

I also increased the buffering around the post to give the copy some breathing room, while also increasing the weight, size and color of the copy, making it more legible on a mobile device. And last but not least, I moved the social share icons to the bottom of the post, so they are right there at your fingertips when you finish reading the post.

Riverbend iPad Ad

Interactive floor plan ad for Timber Home Living's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap on another home. Original design. Supplied photography.

Savvy Shopper iPad Article

Interactive editorial department for Timber Home Living's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap on another chair and swipe on pull tab. Original design. Supplied photography.

Bendheim iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for New Old House's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you swipe to see more images. Original design. Supplied photography.

Talk of the Town iPad Article

Interactive editorial department for Timber Home Living's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap to see more details and scroll to continue reading. Original design. Supplied photography.

The Cabinetmaker iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for New Old House's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap to see full image. Original design. Supplied photography.

Simply Amish iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for Arts & Crafts Home's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you swipe to see more images. Original design. Supplied photography.

Antique Hardware iPad Ad

Interactive display ad for Old House Journal's digital edition on the iPad. Left shows first state when you land on the page, right shows state when you tap to see product details. Original design. Supplied photography.

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